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Maintenance & Grooming

Though Sphinxes are a lovingly admirable cat, they are not maintenance-free. Their care is a little special but not complicated at all. When it comes to skincare the main idea is to maintain the balance of oil secreted in their body. Body oils, which would normally be absorbed by the hair, tend to build on the skin. As a result, bathing is necessary up to once per month (though some can go even longer!). When a sphynx is on a well-balanced diet they should not require over-bathing. We free feed Fromm Hasen Duckenpfeffer Recipes. 

Sphynx do not have eyelashes to hold dust, resulting in tear stains. These can be taken care of every day or two with cotton pads and eyewash or pet-safe wipes. Oils and debris tend to accumulate under the nails and in the skin above the nail due to lack of fur. Weekly, the nails and surrounding skin folds should be gently wiped with a soft wet cloth or baby wipe. Nail trimming should also be checked at this time.

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Sphynx's ears are large and almost completely hairless making them more vulnerable to a build-up of impurities like dirt, skin oils, and ear wax. They should be cleaned weekly with a cotton ball, ear cleaner, and Qtips. Teeth should also be brushed weekly with a baby toothbrush and pet toothpaste.

 

Special care should be taken to limit the Sphynx cat’s exposure to outdoor sunlight, as they can develop sunburns similar to humans. In general, Sphynx cats should never be allowed outdoors unattended, as they have limited means to conserve body heat when it is cold. Some owners provide coats/sweaters in the cooler months to help them conserve body heat.

Once they have reached 18 months of age, an annual Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM) should be completed, long with yearly blood work to ensure the best health and wellbeing of the animal.

Special Tips

  • Be careful when choosing any plants/flowers as many are poisonous to cats

  • Kittens love to hide in the washer and dryer - thoroughly check EVERY TIME

  • Always keep the toilet lids down, especially with small kittens

  • Kitchen foods should be stores away in a cupboard - if they can reach it, they will eat it and it'll likely make them sick.

  • Threads, twist ties, and Christmas tinsel are all harmful to their tummy!

  • The toe webs and retractable nails make wooden pellets the most ideal litter choice 

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Are Sphynx Cats Hypoallergenic?

While they lack much of the fur of other cat breeds, Sphynxes are not necessarily hypoallergenic.

Allergies to cats are triggered by a protein called Fel d1, not cat hair itself. Fel d1 is a protein primarily found in cat saliva and sebaceous glands. Those with cat allergies may react worse to direct contact with Sphynx cats than other breeds; even though reports exist that some people with allergies successfully tolerate Sphynx cats, they are fewer than those who have allergic reactions, according to David Rosenstreich, MD, the director of the Division of Allergy and Immunology at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine and Montefiore Medical Center in the Bronx, New York City, New York.

These positive reports may be cases of desensitizing, wherein the “hairless” cat gave the owner optimism to try to own a cat, eventually leading to the positive situation of their own adaptation.

Do They Have Health Issues?

The Sphynx breed does have instances of the genetic disorder hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Studies are being undertaken to understand the links between breeding and the disorder.

**Annual HCM scanning and blood work should be done to obtain optimal health of the animal**

 

We are excited to be in operation with direct mentoring from whom we acquired our Queen Jynx.  Through selective breeding we are able to offer the finest quality, and most intelligent Purebred Registered Sphynx kittens.  Why is this so important? Our Sphynx breeding gene pool in North America is declining and with that, the increased risk for health issues - like cardio - is taking over our beloved breed. We need to introduce healthier lines to help combat this. TICA has recognized this and is currently working with a group of  dedicated breeders, carefully monitoring the breeding protocol.

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